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Opinion poll

Opinion poll

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In order to have an idea about how well Constantin Brâncuși's work and his connections with Romania are known by artists and people working in the field of culture in Europe (and especially the countries where we perform in this tour: Serbia, Hungary and Austria), we would like to ask you to take part in this short opinion poll: [captainform id="814579"]
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Meinungsumfrage

Meinungsumfrage

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Um eine Vorstellung davon zu bekommen, wie gut die Arbeit von Constantin Brâncuşi und seine Verbindungen zu Rumänien unter Künstlern und Menschen bekannt sind, die auf dem Gebiet der Kultur in Europa tätig sind (vor allem in den Ländern, in denen wir in diese Tournee unternehmen: Serbien, Ungarn und Österreich), möchten wir Sie bitten, an dieser kurzen Meinungsumfrage teilzunehmen: [captainform id="814579"]
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Mulțumim!

Mulțumim!

Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODqtmNziF2s Dragi prieteni, Turneul sud-est / central european al ansamblului Imago Mundi, „Isvor. Constantin Brâncuși”, s-a încheiat. Deși vorbim de un turneu aparent restrâns (4 orașe din 3 țări: Belgrad, Budapesta, Graz, Viena; respectiv Serbia, Ungaria, Austria), vă mărturisim că a fost ...intens :) Mulțumim tuturor celor care ne-au fost alături: Administrația Fondului Cultural Național (AFCN), fără de care proiectul nostru nu ar fi fost posibil – acoperind aproximativ 83% din finanțare, adică transportul internațional, cazarea și cheltuielile de masă pentru ansamblul Imago Mundi și echipa de proiect (9 oameni în total), spotul video și serviciile de graphic-design; Institutul Cultural Român – prin ICR Viena, alături de Ambasada României în Republica Serbia și Consulatul Onorific la Graz (care ne-a asigurat transportul pe ruta Viena-Belgrad-Budapesta / Viena-Graz-Viena și s-a ocupat de…
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Thank you!

Thank you!

News, Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODqtmNziF2s Dear friends, The South-East / Central European Tour of Imago Mundi ensemble, „Isvor. Constantin Brâncuși”, has ended. Although we're talking about an apparently small tour (4 cities from 3 countries: Belgrade, Budapest, Graz, Vienna; respectively Serbia, Hungary, Austria), we have to confess: it was ...intense :) Thank You to all who supported us: The Administration of National Cultural Fund (AFCN), Romanian Cultural Institute (ICR) – through ICR Vienna branch (in partnership with The Embassy of Romania in Republic of Serbia and Honorary Consulatule at Graz), and ICR Budapest branch, Happy Tour, eBrain, EIT Forum Auto and Spandugino Press. But, beyond institutions and companies, there are the people: Mariana Pena and Marian Stoicescu, fundraisers and volunteers of ISVOR Cultural Association; Ms. Lavinia Spandonide, president of Spandugino Press; Irina Cornișteanu, manager…
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Erik Satie: under the spell of Romanian folk music

Erik Satie: under the spell of Romanian folk music

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Much has been made of the eccentricities of this flâneur, who was always seen in a grey velvet suit, and yet underlying Satie’s music is his serious desire to create something new. You can hear it in his popular piano pieces: the haunting scales and rhythms of the Trois Gnossiennes written under the spell of Romanian folk music, and the meditative world of Gymnopédies, where, as in a cubist painting, motifs are “seen” from all sides. Nick Shave, The Guardian read more
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“But Is It Art?” Constantin Brancusi vs. the United States

“But Is It Art?” Constantin Brancusi vs. the United States

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In the 90 years since Constantin Brancusi first conceived Bird in Space, our understanding of what constitutes an artwork, and for that matter, who can occupy the role of artist, has become broader and more inclusive. How do you recognize what is and is not a work of art? Does an artwork’s title help you interpret an artwork? Is a title necessary to give the artwork meaning? (MaryKate Cleary / MoMA) read more
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Carving a way to heaven

Carving a way to heaven

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So magical was the air of Paris in the early 20th century that artists flocked from all over Europe to breathe it, and to be transformed by it. But no trek was as incredible as that of Constantin Brancusi, who walked all the way from his village in Romania - a journey, says Jonathan Jones, that helps to explain the sculptor's mix of folklore and cold surfaces of metal and stone, and the dreamy indestructiblilty of his creations. (Jonathan Jones, The Guardian) read more
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